New York Times Student Journeys

New York Times Student Journeys

Transcript

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my name is molly i’m a senior in pennsylvania

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it’s called the new york times student journeys um

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i did it the summer after my freshman year i 
went on a trip to oxford to study journalism

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the summer after my sophomore year i went 
to silicon valley and south korea to study

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technology and entrepreneurship so new york times 
student journey freshman year we went to oxford

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for i forget if it was two or three weeks um 
and we were like living in like one of like the

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houses for one of the colleges there i’m not 
exactly sure how school works in england but um

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uh there i forget how many of us us there were 
two because there were like two other programs

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also with us like we were the journalism group 
but there was also i think some sort of media

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one and then there was like an international 
relations group there too so i’m not exactly

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sure how many kids were there it was like a lot it 
was probably like 75 um and it was really fun we

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would like tour on oxford and like the whole draw 
of the program is like they bring professionals

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from new york times with you to like teach you 
stuff so like we had a professional journalist

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with us like teaching us journalism tactics we 
were like going out like interviewing locals

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or like we also did a lot of just like cultural 
stuff we went to stonehenge um we went to london

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for the day um things like that it was like we 
are like at the end of the program we had like a

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culminating final project you had a lot of freedom 
with that um you just had read an article of some

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sort because there’s journalism um so i did 
like an op-ed on like who art belongs to and

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they actually they got me an interview with like 
the curator of one of the museums there which is

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really cool so there’s a lot of support 
for like whatever project you want to do

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um and then in my sophomore year once i like got 
into computer science they had one where you went

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to silicon valley for a week like five days or 
something and then you fly to south korea like

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seoul for like seven or eight days so it was like 
two or three weeks total um and that was super fun

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um they also had like a professional journalist 
from new york times there who we had like lectures

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from talking about i think we were talking about 
like technology growth in china and south korea um

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but other than that we were visiting museums and 
like tech companies um we went to like i think we

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were supposed to go to facebook but we couldn’t 
because i had like a security breach but we went

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to google we went to all these ai companies of 
the samsung went to all these museums um and

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then also just like cultural stuff um we went 
to golden gate bridge south korea was super fun

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the new york times basically has all these student 
journeys and i think they offer like 15 of them

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every year and they off like a different theme 
so like the one that i did my freshman year was

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focused on journalism specifically and like how 
to be a journalist but then they have ones that

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you go to like switzerland and do like science or 
they have ones where you go to like texas and do i

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don’t know there’s like a lot there’s ones in like 
fashion and like milan like they have they’re all

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like themed around a specific thing so like the 
people with us were not like computer scientists

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they most of them are like journalists who focus 
on technology so we weren’t actually learning how

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to do computer science we were learning about 
like computer science and tech and it’s like

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impacting like the greater world so it was more 
of like it was just like the theme for the trip

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for the the new york times one i think 
honestly the journalism was a long time

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ago so i don’t remember a lot but 
i think like the best part was just

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being there like getting to travel to oxford and 
like live there and like experience just like

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walking around the street there because it’s like 
like a college town so it’s super cute and fun

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the worst part was the food wasn’t great 
like at the house itself like the breakfast

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was terrible and like especially if you 
have like food and like sensitivities

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they have stuff but there’s like i ended up 
eating a lot of granola bars that i brought

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um i’m like a picky eater though too and i have 
like some food issues but we did get to go out to

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a lot of like nice dinners to like get different 
food but the food at the house itself is not great

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i mean the best part was the people there i like

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ended up making a ton of friends 
that i’m still friends with today

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the worst part i mean the flight was pretty 
bad it was like a super long flight to get from

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san francisco to south korea um and then it 
wasn’t exactly what i thought it was going

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to be like i kind of was under the impression 
we’d be like doing a lot more computer science

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or like doing technology like stuff 
but it’s more like learning about it

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like in context of learning the 
history or learning about like

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like startups and growth and things like that so 
it wasn’t as like educational as i thought it was

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going to be as more cultural but like that it was 
fun it was like more like a vacation type trip

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i don’t know how like selective they are 
in terms of the application like i know

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there’s an application you need teacher 
rex and stuff but i don’t think you

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i don’t remember if you have to write an 
essay or anything and i know like my friend

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he he was trying to get into his math program that 
summer and he didn’t get in and i was like hey i’m

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doing this like tech program thing you should 
apply and he applied like last minute and got in

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so i don’t know exactly how difficult it is to get 
into their programs especially that one was brand

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new too so i don’t think they’re that that many 
people trying to get into that one but um i don’t

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i don’t exactly know how like selective they are 
i think for the new york times one i honestly just

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can’t remember how complicated the application 
was but i don’t remember writing essays for it

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so i think my my recommendation would be just like 
pick good i know you have smitty direct so i think

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pick teachers who can just speak well about who 
you are as a person like your interest like i know

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when i applied to the tech one i had my computer 
science teacher write my rack and when i applied

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to the the journalism when i had my english 
teacher write my rack so like pick teachers who

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you know can like speak well to you as a person 
because they don’t look at that much of your stuff

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if those are places that you want to visit like 
it’s worth the money i love england and i always

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wanted to go to oxford and like stonehenge and 
stuff like that so it was kind of like i was

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getting like the educational access aspect of the 
program and like the new york times people plus

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like traveling somewhere i wanted to be and like 
same with the south korea one so i think if like

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those are places that you wanted to go i 
think it it helps like make it worth value

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you

TASP (Telluride Association Summer Program)

TASP (Telluride Association Summer Program)

Transcript

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i’m shelby i am a senior at the mississippi

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school for math and science which is a 
residential high school in mississippi

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and i’m going to duke university in the fall

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finding out that i got into tasp first of 
all was just like a huge moment for me because

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it’s a really really selective program and i 
had no idea i even had a shot at getting in

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um so 60 students are selected for the program 
and 15 students go into each of four seminars

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i got my first choice pick on my seminars which 
was a seminar on education and citizenship which

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is a topic i’m really really really fascinated 
in we discussed with two professors this about

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600 page course reader we we went from like 
platonic philosophy to romantic poetry and then

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read court cases through the years on education 
on education and a lot of educational philosophy

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pieces and it really really changed my outlook 
on things um i got to talk with students from

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all over the nation who had completely different 
backgrounds and experiences it was the most

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diverse group of students i’ve ever been a part of 
we asked questions that i before would have never

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thought to ask we all of our conversations 
centered around equity and making schools

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better places for students for teachers and how 
we could use schools to build up communities

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and outside of the seminar which we had four days 
a week and we had a paper to write every friday

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and we did lots of social events we had 
really cool guest speakers come and talk to us

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professors and legislative fellows and we had a 
lot of and we we were allowed to plan all of the

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activities for our cohort with the the big thing 
about tasp is self-governance so we would meet

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once a week and we would schedule lists of things 
we wanted to do so we had game nights we used our

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group’s budget to mail ourselves tea and 
face masks and um we had a self-care night

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we had political discussions we watched movies 
together and so we it’s the out of all the virtual

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experiences i’ve had this year this was the most 
effective at like really building a community

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me and some of the people from my cohort would 
stay up all night some nights just talking and

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swapping experiences one of my best friends now 
lives in massachusetts and if you can imagine

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massachusetts and mississippi are very different 
places but somehow we still find ways to connect

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and she’s one of like i talk to her every single 
day and i have we have regular zoom calls with me

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and a few of the people from my tasp we have 
a group chat i actually made friends in the

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virtual format with all of us spread out across 
the country and even like internationally um

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one of the people in our group was from 
canada so it was really really cool

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i applied to multiple summer programs however

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everything but tasp was cancelled 
um but tasp was my first choice

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anyway um because i just really thought with the 
community aspect and the self-governance aspect

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and being able to really build my own experience 
with the people in my cohort would be really

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really awesome i thought that i’d be able to 
take the most from that experience and the

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education and citizenship seminar in particular 
really interested in me interested me i’m hoping

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to be an educator after college so that’s 
something i’m really really passionate about

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the tasp is completely free um 
which is a big highlight of it

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they really really want like 
low-income students and minority

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students like i said our group was very diverse 
and i think a lot of us were low-income students

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i’d have to say the best part of 
the program was the people i met um

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one of the common things that we all connected 
over was the fact that we didn’t really know a

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lot of people like ourselves because everyone 
in my group was determined to learn as much as

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they could about the world around them and apply 
it to really change the world everyone i met at

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tasp wanted to change the world and wanted to have 
a positive impact on the society they lived in and

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we really bonded over that and from that we had 
so many discussions that have forever changed me

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i really don’t have any negatives it 
was a super cool experience besides like

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zoom exhaustion um i’d say it was an 
incredibly incredibly diverse community

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except for like political beliefs and i 
think we could have had more interesting

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conversations about politics if there was 
more of a spectrum but everyone leaned left

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um so that that was something that i don’t know 
maybe it would have been a little more interesting

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to have differently but i i really don’t 
think there was necessarily a worst part of it

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well obviously it was different 
than i expected because of covid

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and i was expecting to like be able to go to 
maryland and stay there but and while like the

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whole time i wished it would have been in person 
and i would have gotten that experience that

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everyone said was so life-changing it was still 
life-changing and i think they did the very best

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they possibly could with the format we had um so 
obviously that’s a major difference and i think

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they maintained all the elements of the program 
they promised in the brochures besides that

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i would say to pour your 
heart and soul into the essays

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those the essays for the application are very 
long um and what they’re really looking for

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is a desire to learn they don’t want you to be 
perfect you don’t have to be that accomplished but

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they want you to love learning and love connecting 
with people and they also value maturity and being

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able to solve conflict and have conversations with 
people who are different than you and if you can

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highlight those things and also highlight some 
unique aspects of yourself that make you stand

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out that will really give you a shot at getting 
in i mean i’m not on the selection committee so i

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obviously don’t know fully but i think those were 
the common threads in my friend’s essays and mine

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i felt i didn’t feel great about my interview 
because my interviewer was a math professor

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in canada who i had nothing in common with um 
but i was able to tell him about my experience

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where i live and we were able to contrast 
some of the things that we had experienced

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and also the questions they will hit you in 
with in the interview are quite difficult

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and will catch you off guard the first 
question my interview viewer asked me

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was why does racism exist and i had to 
step back for a minute and think because

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that is a difficult question to answer and 
a lot of the questions are like that and

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will really and they really just want to hear 
the way you think and reason through things

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you