Transcript

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i’m yo vidyal i’m a first year in college 
and i’m currently in texas but i’m from hakel

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i attended the minority’s introduction 
to engineering and science hosted by mit

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and i attended summer 2019 and well covid wasn’t 
a thing so obviously i went there in person

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so the program was a six-week residential um 
program that you would if you were able to go to

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mit on campus and you would take five college 
classes as if you’re like a college student

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even though we’re um during this time period that 
they allow people to be accepted you have to be

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an incoming senior so it’s obviously um going to 
help you transfer or it helps you transfer into a

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college application season and also helps you with 
your career-wise and to like what to expect in

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college and it’s for like minority students with 
high academic backgrounds it’s a highly selective

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program um it’s really cool though so you get to 
go over there you take five classes and throughout

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that you get to meet a lot of amazing influential 
people i remember we’d have lectures well not

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lectures but after classes we’d have um speakers 
that we’d attend and there were people from like

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twitter from google it was like some physicists 
um our tas were just as um amazing because they

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would have internship work with like nobel prize 
winners and they talk about them they were from

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like colleges of all over i remember most of 
them were from like mit or stamford it was just

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a lot of brilliant people in one room really like 
down to earth just wanting to help you like pursue

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what you want in stem and trying to get you into 
the field of stem and make it a little bit less

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intimidating especially for minorities because it 
is very hard for us to get into that career path

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um but yeah um and it also gets you it allows 
you to build a community in a sense and it helps

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you network i just know that it’s really just 
meant to help you with like everything that

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you’re usually clueless about with resumes um 
fly-ins colleges how to choose your college

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college applications what major you want to be 
in what to expect internships all that fun stuff

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we were given the opportunity to choose 
an extracurricular class and you would be

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given different ranges there would be like 
electronics and there was machine learning

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and there was robotics you would be put into one 
if you wanted to explore through it or and like

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when you were in that class you’re just like wow 
like i can’t believe i just did this like you

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would make a speaker or you would make a robot 
autonomously move from like side to side it was

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just like absolutely insane i would say really 
fortified me becoming an engineer and we’d also

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have the opportunity to look at other 
career paths or like design labs or research

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facilities and be able to go in and see what they 
would do on a daily basis it was just absolutely

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the same the opportunities were given since 
it was a like highly selective program it was

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there only a small group of people got 
accepted into it and i think that’s what made

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having a community amongst 
these people even better

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there was 80 but it was still within a six week 
period of span you were able to talk to each

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and every one of them and have some sort of like 
friendship form but honestly it was a lot of fun

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um you were given a lot of opportunity to venture 
out with these friends that you would make and

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like explore boston if you wanted to you were able 
to like have the freedom to go wherever you wanted

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as long as you told your chaperone of course 
you can’t just like go off into another city

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um i thought that was really cool so like social 
life easy that was like the easiest part everyone

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didn’t want to do school work they just wanted 
to socialize outside of their dorms all the time

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the dorm was really nice uh it was really 
randomized when it came to whether you would

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have a roommate or not i didn’t have a roommate 
but others would have like three roommates or two

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roommates or just one roommate it just really 
depended on like which dorm you were put in um

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dorms were nice there was a curfew did we follow 
it no but it’s okay uh the food we were given an

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80 little food card and it would replenish every 
week and you could use it at any restaurant around

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mit or you can use it at the dining hall a lot of 
people would eat at the dining hall the dino hall

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food was really good in my opinion it was like 
chicken tenders and like macaroni and i it was

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happened to me and they would even have like a 
little ice cream bar and i thought that was cool

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um so the food the social life the dining was 
pretty great and we would also have like family

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meetings once a week where um it was just 
like all 80 of us and we’d like be in like

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a room and we just like talked to each other or 
we’d also have like break from tutoring because

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i i don’t know what they’re called 
like breakouts like once a week where

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you had to like put all your books down 
and like not study anymore and just like

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be around with each other and sit with each other 
and once a week we would have a social activity

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whether it would be like going to the beach or 
having like a scavenger hunt or having like a

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barbecue for the fourth of july it was really 
cool i think social life there was pretty fun

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definitely overwhelming compared to high school 
courses but maybe that was just for my high school

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because i know other kids were doing just fine 
with the workload but it was definitely hard

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you would have to put a lot of time into what 
you’re studying i would say the best parts were

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the weekly social activities because you know you 
didn’t have to do schoolwork and you’re just like

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having fun with a bunch of friends i would say 
that was definitely one of the greatest parts

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it’s the worst part i wouldn’t say this is the 
worst part it’s just more of a learning curve

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being able to take the workload that they give 
you and um actually time manage and be able to

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efficiently like get everything done because 
we weren’t given a lot of time in the day

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we’d be gone at like nine in the morning and we 
wouldn’t be back in our dorms until like six pm

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and even then we would have office 
hours that we needed to attend and then

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truly we would only have time to do 
homework starting at like midnight

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and also depending on how far you lived from mit 
i guess the distance from home i did get a little

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homesick so i would just say not necessarily the 
worst part but something to get used to we were

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connected to mission offices they would give us 
um once a week lectures about what to expect with

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the college applications they would talk about the 
common app not only the mit app you’re also given

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access to the mit financial aid advisors and 
they would help you with like the whole financial

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process of mit and other colleges um a lot of 
our tas were from mit and other nice colleges

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so i would say that also counts and the 
professors that we were given were also in

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the community of mit some of them were actually 
professors there some of them did their graduate

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there and they decided to study over the summer so 
i do say we did connect a lot with the community

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over there and either way it was over the 
summer and i’m pretty sure some students

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were taking summer classes and so at the rec 
there would probably be like actual mit students

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it was free so i guess it was worth 
the cost it was absolutely free

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dining food everything paid for the 
only thing that you had to pay for

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was the transportation to boston and 
back but even then i found sponsors

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in the application you’re given like um a 
psat option to put in your score sat option

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don’t worry about your scores i don’t think 
that’s what they’re necessarily looking for

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in the end they don’t want like the smartest 
because they just want to be able to bring

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opportunities to the kids that i think need the 
most that have high academic backgrounds so your

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score your test score isn’t everything so don’t 
be so panicked about it i do say that the essays

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are very important especially since it’s 
very limited in words so every word should

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be impactful and truthful to who you are as 
a person don’t pretend to be anything else

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because i feel like they know they will know 
if you’re bluffing or trying to be like oh

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i won a nobel peace prize when i was like five 
you know like that’s a way extreme example of

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it but just be truthful to yourself be honest 
with them as long as they can see that you’re

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passionate about it and you’re willing to work 
hard you have a good chance of getting them

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you